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Gaillardia Hall

Gaillardia Hall Exterior
Gaillardia Hall Exterior

Gaillardia Hall, centrally located on campus, supports our continued “green” initiatives and has received GOLD LEED certification by the United States Green Building Council. 

Gaillardia Hall is a New Traditional Hall with four to six pods per floor and eight to ten residents per pod who share a keyed multi-bathroom. 

 Hall Staff
 302 Student Center
San Marcos, TX 78666
 Opened 2012

Quick View

 306 Beds
  Single Gender by Floor
 6 Floors
 Outside Amphitheater
  WiFi Throughout

 Located Near

LBJ Student Center
Student Health Center
Bobcat Tram Bus Loop


Provided Furniture

Extra-Long Twin Bed
(80" Mattress)

Desk and Desk Chair

Lockable Pedestal


Loftable Bed



Pool and Ping-Pong Tables

Lobby and Study Lounge

Full Community Kitchen

WiFi Internet
Connection in Room


Conference /
Multi-Purpose Room


Special Features

Elevated Ceiling

Shared Walk-in Closet

Mirror Provided in Closet

Laundry on 1st Floor


Room Specs

Double Bedroom Size:
16' x 14.5'

Single Bedroom Size:
13' x 14'

Window Size:
72" x 60"

Floor Plan



L: 80"
W: 35"
D: 6"
Loftable at Highest: 59"
Loftable at Lowest: 29"


5 Shelves (per student)
2 Hanging Areas (per student)
H: 78"
W: 74"
D: 15.5"
From Hanging Rod to Floor: 78"


3 Drawers
H: 30"
W: 29.5"
D: 24"

Useable Space Excluding Closet

L: 183"
W: 121"
From Window to Floor: 41"


H: 30"
W: 26"
L: 24"



2 Power Outlets (per student)
2 Ethernet Ports
1 Cable Port

Lockable Pedestal

H: 30"
W: 17"
D: 24"



Shared by 6-10 neighboring residents
3 Vanities
2 Toilets
2 Showers

History of Gaillardia

Gaillardia Hall is named for the school flower. Texas State’s school colors of maroon and metallic gold are inspired by this native wildflower, which is also referred to as an “Indian blanket” or “Mexican blanket” for its resemblance to brightly patterned blankets made by Native Americans.

Hall Artwork

Gaillardia Hall features artwork inspired by the San Marcos River. The “Fish Bellies,” created by artists Joe O’Connell and Blessing Hancock of Creative Machines resides in the courtyard between Gaillardia and Chautauqua halls. Made of layers of frosted acrylic, the Fish Bellies’ forms draw inspiration from the social and biological diversity of the nearby San Marcos River reflecting parallels between its ecological life and the University’s varied student body. During the day, the piece’s translucency operates like an ethereal anatomy whereas at night it transforms into a bioluminescent landscape.